Hlo Heaven

Today’s post will be brief, as I’ve been procrastinating (watching Great British Baking Show, cooking food, looking at Facebook, you know ūüôā ), and I still have lots of studying to do, and Tim and I are supposed to play Jaipur too!

ANYWAY, ¬†I wanted to let you know about an exciting development. ¬†We are bringing The Roll Model¬ģ Method Teacher Trainings to the Center for Neurosomatic Studies! I cannot convey how excited I am about this. ¬†The whole reason I found out about neurosomatic therapy is because a Yoga Tune Up¬ģ teacher took her son to an NST therapist and was blown away by the treatment. She commented on it ¬†on the YTU Teachers Facebook page. I was in the middle of trying to figure out what I wanted to do with my life (I wanted to help people in the health/wellness arena, but did not want to go back to school for 6 more years and spend $100,000 on tuition). Her post sparked my interest, and upon Googling, I found ¬†my school. ¬†And here we are, about 2 years later, and I am on the cusp of graduating from CNS!

Anyway, back to my original point, in school we are taught how invaluable it is to give patients “homework.” It’s vital to help remodel their bodies, and it also helps them realize they have an internal locus of control. Their therapist/doctor is not responsible for their health, the patient himself/herself is! ¬†The self-massage that is taught in Yoga Tune Up¬ģ is a perfect compliment to the work we do in NST. ¬†This has become abundantly clear to me as I’ve progressed through the program, so much so, that I thought, “We HAVE to bring a YTU training to this school!”

I talked to my teacher, mentor, and school-owner, Randy, and he readily agreed. ¬†And my dream is coming to fruition! ¬†In March, we will offer both of The Roll Model¬ģ Method Trainings at CNS! ¬†One of my teachers from my Yoga Tune Up ¬ģ Level 1 training is going to teach the class. ¬†She ¬†made a huge impact on me during the Level 1. I remember telling her, “I’m just a part-time yoga teacher. I just do this on the side…” ¬†And she called me out on minimizing myself and my skills, and it solidly hit home! ¬†The fact that this super-talented, intelligent, gifted woman thought I had something real to offer to people gave me a whole new perspective on what was possible! ¬†And she is the person who will be teaching this class. ¬†ūüôā

Here are the links to the classes:

The Roll Model¬ģ Method – The Science of Rolling

The Roll Model¬ģ Method – Ball Sequencing & Innovation

If you are at all interested in learning some easy-to-use self-massage techniques for yourself or your clients/patients, I cannot recommend this training highly enough. I would so love to see you there!

Hope you are having a great Sunday!

 

 



 

 

The Fabulous, Fantastic, Fearless Foot

I now know ALL the muscles in the body. ¬†Ha! I wish. ¬†I mean, I think I’ve probably learned about all the muscles in the body, but I don’t remember them all. ¬†Yet. ¬†We just finished up learning about the lower body, all the way down to the feet. ¬†I had no idea that feet are so complicated!! ¬†As we learned in class, the complex nature of the feet makes them capable of amazing feets/feats (get it!!), but it also makes them prone to a variety of issues. ¬†How many people do you know that have bunions or plantar fasciitis or heel spurs or hammer toes? ¬†A lot of these issues are caused by misuse/abuse of the feet. ¬†I’m going to try to provide a very high level overview of the feet and then show you what you can do to bring relief and increased awareness to the feet. ¬†And before I forget to mention it, if you have any of these issues, neurosomatic therapy can help!! ¬†I graduate in February, so come see me!!

Ok. ¬†First of all. ¬†Let’s look at the boney structure of the foot. ¬†You have the big heel bone (aka calcaneus), on top of which sits the talus, which fits into an arch (aka mortise) made by your shin bone (aka tibia) and fibula (the bone that’s on the outside of your lower leg). ¬†This forms the joint of the ankle. ¬†Next you have an assortment of oddly shaped bones that fit together like puzzle pieces – the navicular, cuboid, and cuneiforms. ¬†Next you have the long skinny bones of your foot, the metatarsals, which connect to your toes, which are made up of phalanges. ¬†Here is a picture to give you an overview:

These bones are held together by tons of ligaments (very strong connective tissue), and connecting with these bones are all the muscles of your lower leg and foot.  These ligaments and muscles maintain the two arches of your foot. Yes! There are two arches down there!  There is the longitudinal arch, which forms your instep.  And then there is the transverse arch, which goes horizontally across your foot.  These two arches work together to absorb force from the ground and transmit it up the body.

Man, I’m just getting started. ¬†I really wanted to discuss the the muscles IN the foot too. ¬†Did you know there are TWELVE of them (depending on how you count them) and FOUR separate layers of muscles? ¬†Just bonkers. But we’ll have to discuss the bonkeriness in another post because this one is already getting too long.

Let’s get to the really fun stuff. What can you do if you have foot pain? ¬†One easy thing to do is to get a small, soft ball (I recommend a Yoga Tune Up¬ģ ball, due to its squishy, pliable nature) and step on it. ¬†Yep. ¬†Just stepping on the ball will increase your awareness of your feet and start to dissolve tension between all those tiny joints. ¬†Here is a video that will guide you through an eye-opening foot roll.

https://vimeo.com/211185607

You can also increase awareness of your feet (and help bring energy down from that monkey mind into your feet, which is very grounding) by meditating on your feet.  Here is a 10 minute meditation that will guide you through that.

Hopefully you have a better understanding of your amazing feet now!  I hope you find some time to give your feet some love today.  Let me know what you think of the video and or meditation.

Have a great Sunday!

 

 

Butt Stuff

Yep. ¬†Are you like Troy Barnes? ¬†Do you love Butt Stuff? ¬†¬†Well then you’re in luck! ¬†We covered Butt Stuff this week. ¬†And by “Butt Stuff” I mean all that meat that covers your backside. ¬†Did you know that there are actually 3 different gluteal muscles that make up “the glutes”? ¬†Yes! It’s true.

The gluteus maximus is the big boy, as the name implies. ¬†It runs from the lateral edge of your sacrum all the way out to your femur (the long bone in the top of your leg). ¬†The top part of the muscle merges into the IT band on the outside of the leg, and the lower portion attaches to the back of your femur. ¬†But underneath that are two more glute muscles! ¬†The gluteus medius lies underneath the maximus, and underneath THAT lies yet another muscle – the gluteus minimus. ¬†Please see my quick sketch below to get an idea of how these muscles lie in relation to each other. ¬†And yes, I forgot the “l” in gluteus minimus and had to go back in and squeeze it in later. Thank you, Tim, for the .388mm pens. ūüôā

Underneath all of these layers are the deep rotators of the hip, but I’ll have to save those for another blog post, or this will get too massively long, and I have a test to study for! ¬†And a bike ride and brunch to do!

So, your glutes. ¬†Why are they important? ¬†Well, glute max is the largest muscle in the body and can be up to 2 to 3 inches thick! Consequently, it can have a huge impact on postural distortions. ¬†The glute group can cause pelvic extension (a “tucked” tail), pelvic projection (where the hips are thrust forward of the feet and knees), a pelvic tilt (where one side of the pelvis is higher than the other), external rotation of the femur (“duck feet”), and low back pain. ¬†These muscles can also mimic sciatic pain – sending trigger point referrals into the buttocks and down the back and side of the leg.

Issues with the glutes are quite common, considering we are supposed to use them to MOVE all day long, but we generally just use them to SIT all day long instead. As a result, many people have difficulties activating their “sleepy” glutes. ¬†This became really evident to me when I took a Yoga Tune Up¬ģ workshop where we went through the following guided practice:

  1. Lay on the floor, legs straight out (aka savasana).
  2. Try to squeeze your right butt check.  Try the left. Do you know notice any difference in power/contraction?  How far did your hips lift off the floor with each squeeze?
  3. Take a massage therapy ball (a Yoga Tune Up ball, a tennis ball, etc.) and place it under the thickest part of just the right butt cheek.
  4. Contract the right butt cheek for 20 seconds, as you release the contraction, the ball will sink deeper into the glutes.  Repeat 2-3 times, sinking deeper each time.
  5. You can rock your body slowly side to side over the ball.
  6. Without sitting up, reach under your glute and remove the ball.
  7. Let your awareness settle back into the glutes.  Does the right side feel any different than the left?  Any changes in temperature?  sensation?
  8. Contract the right butt cheek. Then the left.
  9. Do you notice any difference in power/activation/sensation in the right side?

If you were like me, you were like, “OMG. ¬†My right side has so much more power now!!!” ¬†You just woke up your butt!!

The YTU balls are great for increasing proprioception and awareness of these muscles, and with regular use, you can keep these muscles active and reduce the chronic tension that is held there.  At the Center for Neurosomatic Studies, we are trained to treat this group of muscles VERY specifically.  In addition to treating the muscle belly (which is what you contact with the balls), we get into the attachments and different layers of tissue, and we can even get into that trough on the medial aspect of the greater trochanter.  The combination of self-massage and bodywork is super helpful for this powerhouse.

Let me know if you have any questions or comments.  If you try the exercise described above, let me know how it feels for you.  I personally store a lot of tension in my glutes, so when I get them treated or I roll them out, I feel super relaxed and down-regulated afterwards.  Good luck waking up your butt!

 

 

Week 3 – On Contemplating Change Vs. Implementing Change

Today was the first week of normal classes at CNS. ¬†Monday we had Basic Massage. Tuesday was Advanced Technique. Wednesday was Business. Thursday was more Advanced Technique. ¬†Friday was Anatomy and Pyshiology. I’m concerned about my success in A&P because I cannot yet spell physiology correctly. ¬†Wait! I think I just figured it out!!

It’s been a super interesting week. ¬†I really love the Tech and A&P class. They are taught by the founders of the school and their passion really shines through in their teaching. You KNOW that they believe that this form of therapy changes lives. Not only does it change the life of the patient, but it has a domino effect and changes the lives of the people the patients interact with. ¬†This is a Difference Maker. ¬†It is so fulfilling to be surrounded by that kind of conviction and knowledge.

During the Tech class, we learn the  neurosomatic techniques. This week we learned how to address the muscles in the front of the neck Рinfrahyoids, suprahyoids, the deep anterior cervical muscles (the muscles that connect to the vertebrae), the scalenes (the muscles that move your neck from side to side) and the sternocleidomastoid Рthe muscle that flexes, tilts, and rotates the neck.

These are super impactful (is that a word??) muscles to treat. ¬†Treating these can help immensely with ear, jaw, throat, and shoulder pain, thoracic outlet syndrome, and migraines. ¬†However, they are a….sensitive area to treat. ¬†There are lots of trigger points in these muscles, and one of the treatments involves moving the trachea out of the way. ¬†So… ¬†It’s really important work with lots of benefits, but it’s also work that requires a lot of trust and practice. ¬†People just aren’t used to therapists fiddling around with the front of their necks!

My first A&P class was Friday. ¬†The teacher is…just amazing. You can tell he really loves the material and believes 100% in it its importance. ¬†He is lively, animated, funny, and super knowledgeable- which is a must, if you are sitting through 4 hours of anatomy lecture. ¬†It was totally overwhelming. ¬†Completely. He also told us that over 1/2 of the first term students fail their first anatomy test. I have never failed a test. ¬†I don’t know how I would deal with that!! I hope I don’t have to find out.

I took copious notes and also recorded the session.  Today I used the pomodoro technique to tackle studying.  With this technique, you focus 100% for 25 minutes and then take a 3-5 minute break (which I used to roll out my upper back, shoulders and pecs with the Yoga Tune Up balls).  I found that knowing that I only had to work for 25 minutes relieved some of the anxiety I was feeling about tackling this huge subject!  At first I really struggled with how to approach studying.  But once I started looking at my notes, looking at the pictures in my Thieme book, and tying the two together (and reminding myself to BE PATIENT), I felt so much better.  The terminology started to make sense.  The names of things in the body actually do have some logic to them, and that started to present itself as I worked.

I did about 4 pomodoro sessions and then took a long break. ¬†I, uh, watched Miss Congeniality. ¬†It’s a really excellent movie, actually.

But now I’m going to go back and do some more homework – I have some reading to tackle. I like to read before I go to bed because I feel as if the information just kind of floats around in the ol’ brain pan and settles in better that way.

Tomorrow I am meeting a couple of classmates to practice my neck-spearing technique (aka treating the superficial anterior cervical muscles). ¬†Then I’ll do some more studying, meal prep for the week (steel cut oats, quinoa, and BBQ pork in the Instant Pot). Hopefully I will figure out a way to have some FUN tomorrow. ¬†Figuring out fun stuff is actually quite challenging!!

Oh! I guess I should circle back to the whole theme of this post Рchange!!  I was talking to a dear friend of mine who has been with me step-by-step as I contemplated coming to this school.  She is intimately familiar with all the doubt, fear, and indecision I was experiencing.  My therapist said I was in Decision Purgatory, and that is the perfect description.

Well, Angela and I were talking about my current state, and I told her that living in Florida and going to school just feels, well, normal now! ¬†She reminded me of how petrified I was of making this change. It made me realize that CONTEMPLATION of change is the really scary thing. ¬†Actually EXPERIENCING ¬†the change is NBD (no big deal). ¬†You just deal with it, like you deal with everything. ¬†The Ego is a funny thing. I’ve been pretty entertained lately by watching its machinations. ¬†Between lots of reading of Kiran Trace and listening to Matthew Kahn’s podcast, I’ve realized that it’s all about awareness without judgement. I can FEEL whatever I want to feel, and that is 100% OK. ¬†I just need to observe how I feel and let that be OK. ¬†I’m doing a lot of “Huh. ¬†That’s interesting.”

Hope you are having a fabulous Saturday.

Take care,

Hlo

 

After further thought…

My students Thursday night asked me a couple of questions that I was not really prepared to answer.  I tossed out the first thing that came to the top of my head, but after further reflection, I have more to add. It takes awhile for my brain to get into gear!

Question 1:  What is the biggest change I have noticed with doing yoga regularly?

This one caused a rush of conflicting thoughts in my head, even though it seems like a simple question. ¬†A lot of this tumult of thought circled around, “I don’t actually DO yoga regularly!” ¬†I have a varied movement practice – I jog a couple of days a week, I lift a couple of days a week, I attend a yoga class once every couple of weeks, I do one of Jill Miller’s videos once or twice a week.

I’m conflicted about even calling myself a yoga teacher, in point of fact, because I feel as if it can give people the impression that I practice 6 days a week for 90 minutes everyday, and I can do handstands¬†and splits and crazy binds. ¬†I can’t do any of that stuff, so I don’t teach any of that stuff. ¬†I help people understand their bodies better with the aid of the Yoga Tune Up¬ģ balls and mindful mobility and strengthening work. ¬†We crawl, we swing, we roll, we look at pictures of muscles in books. ¬†Is that “yoga”? ¬†Technically yes (as I understand it), but I fear it’s not what people typically consider yoga to be.

So once all of that darted through my head, I settled back on the question – what is the biggest chance I have noticed? ¬†I told the class¬†that after taking the YTU Level 1 training, I noticed that I felt myself stacked over my feet better – like I wasn’t leaning forward all the time. ¬†That was the biggest change for me.

And that is true, but, upon reflection, what I have really noticed from my mindful movement practices is that I have more Awareness now. ¬†I notice when my shoulders start to creep up around my ears, I notice when I start breathing shallowly, I notice when random parts of my body tense up (like my hands or my belly), I notice (with a slight bit of detachment) when I feel annoyed or angry, I notice when my mind is going a million miles per minute. ¬†Sometimes I just notice these things. Sometimes I notice them and then try to change them – I will stretch, or roll on the balls, or reflect on whether it’s worth it to get angry about this situation. ¬†That Awareness is what I have noticed most from doing yoga.

Question 2:  Does it ever get better, or do you have to constantly work at it (re: muscle tightness)?

My answer to this was, you really do need to keep working at it. ¬†You can’t just roll and relax and be done with it. ¬†You need a relaxation maintenance package. ūüôā

And that is true!  But what I forgot to mention was that if you change your habits (especially postural habits), you can start to alleviate tension all over the body.  For example, if you stack your ears over your shoulders, it releases strain in the back of the neck, the back of the head, the tops of the shoulders, and the jaw.

So, while you still should continue to move your body as much as possible (whether in “yoga” or some other mindful movement practice), if you move your body BETTER and use Awareness to re-position yourself in a joint-stacked position, you will over time reduce pain and tension in the body. ¬†Instead of trying to fit another exercise class into your day to keep yourself supple, you can continuously adjust yourself as you are walking, reading, doing the dishes, working at your computer. ¬†As Katy Bowman always says, Stack Your Life! ¬†Improve your mobility while doing the other things in life you have to do.

I’m still not sure that fully answers both questions, but if I wait until I have a perfect answer, I will never get this posted!

Hope you are having a great Memorial Day weekend and that you can get out outside, put your toes in the grass, laugh with your friends and family, and eat delicious food!

 

Foot Rollin’

One of my favorite things to do with the Yoga Tune Up¬ģ balls is roll the bottoms of my feet. It’s also one of my favorite things to teach. ¬†It’s one of the most impactful areas to roll out. It relieves tension in the whole back body line, brings amazing awareness to the feet, and just generally blows peoples’ minds. ūüôā

I made a 5 minute video showing how to roll out the feet. You can watch it here. ¬†I only demo one foot, but don’t forget to do both feet (of course!).

I follow Katy Bowman’s advice and try to “stack my life.” ¬†I keep a pair of YTU balls at work, and I roll my feet assiduously when I am on conference calls. ¬†My feet are much more nimble (and bigger – I grew a shoe size!) now.

Let me know what you think in the comments!

The dangers of learning

I just returned home this morning from my 5th Yoga Tune Up¬ģ training, the Core Integration Immersion. If you take a body and chop off the head, arms, and legs – well, not only would you have a horrible mess, but in the chunk left over, you have a good representation of the area we learned about in this immersion.

We spent each¬†morning doing a core integration practice which consisted of rolling on the therapy balls to bring awareness into the tissues, and then we activated¬†those tissues in typical Yoga Tune Up¬ģ fashion, which means activating them in fun and weird atypical ways. YTU is typically very atypical (see photos below as proof). ¬†Thanks to our teacher, Dinneen Viggiano for taking these¬†pictures!

16508238_10210354829840605_2052980848247468503_n

As with all trainings that I go to, I leave feeling as if I know NOTHING!! ¬†The more I learn, the more I realize how little I know. ¬†It’s pretty annoying to keep bumping up against one’s own ignorance over and over again, yet I keep doing it!!

However, I know that once my brain gets a chance to recover from being overstimulated, the information starts to soak in, and a tiny piece of a massively complicated puzzle clicks into place.  I integrate and absorb what resonates with me.  The feeling of overwhelm starts to subside, I get the pleasure of sharing my new knowledge with other people who will find it useful, and then I start thinking about what training class I am going to go to next.

Once I get a chance to digest all this information with both the brain in my head and the brain in my gut (yep Рthere is essentially another brain in that there Core), I will write some more posts on what I learned.  I also promised my brother a short video on how to do Uddihyana Bandha (a diaphragm exercise that has an insanely long list of benefits), so I will make a post about that as well.

So, thank you for reading, and more to come!!

On Becoming a Roll Model

Well, it’s official! ¬†I attended The Science of Rolling, Ball Sequencing¬†& Innovation, turned in the homework and took the final. I am now a Certified Roll Model¬ģ Method Practitioner! ¬†What does this mean, you ask? ¬†It means that I can guide you through some really amazing self-myofascial sessions that will leave you feeling more relaxed, taller, and more attuned to your body.

One of my homework assignments was to create a 5 minute video where I teach all the rolling techniques. ¬†The video is below. ¬†This was our first shot, and it was chilly and overcast, so I called it good. ¬†I learned a lot that I will incorporate into video #2, if/when we make it! ¬†The video will give you a general idea of what I mean when I say either “ball-rolling” or “self-myofascial release.” ¬†This sequence will also help relieve tightness in the ankles and knees (great for runners!!).

[vimeo 189527194 w=640 h=360]

Calf Mash from Heather Longoria on Vimeo.

Basically you use the grippy, pliable Yoga Tune Up¬ģ therapy balls to lengthen muscles, relieve tightness and tension, hydrate tissues, and just generally make you feel better in your body.

I have been teaching these techniques at a yoga studio, private club, in private lessons, and in corporate yoga classes, and everyone falls in love with the balls after their first session. It is unbelievable how much change you can effect in the body with a few minutes of strategic rolling.  Self care is the best form of health care!

That is my update for now. If you are interested in finding out more about Yoga Tune Up¬ģ or the Roll Model¬ģ, hit me up in the comments or use the Contact Me link.

Woo Boy – And… It’s almost September

Holy cow. August is almost over.  Where did it go??  What happened to Summer?  Will life continue to fly by like this?

Ok, I’ll get you up to speed on the important stuff.

  • ¬†I went to the Yoga Tune Up¬ģ Breath & Bliss in L.A. ¬†It was a 3 day intensive all about down regulating the nervous system, primarily by stimulating the vagus nerve. ¬†The class BLEW MY MIND and opened my eyes to the variety of ways we can manipulate our structure and mind into calming the #$% down! ¬†This information is so direly needed by EVERYONE. ¬†I’ve been incorporating the savasana techniques into all my classes, and I ordered a box of Corgeous balls, so that I’m ready to launch a weekly class devoted solely to down regulation. ¬†It’s going to be soooooo lovely. ¬†When I get approval for the class, I’ll add it to my schedule here on the blog, so you know where to find me. ¬† Here is a quick tip to try out tonight: ¬†Lay on your back, knees bent, feet on the floor. ¬†Wedge a yoga block or pillow under your sacrum (when the head is lower than the heart, the vagus nerve slows down the heart rate). ¬†On your inhale, feel your belly swell, on the exhale, let the belly fall to the spine and hum as your breath leaves the body. ¬†The humming also stimulates the vagus nerve, further transporting you to the Rest & Digest mode.
  • My dad had a heart attack. ¬†That was two weeks of lots of good and lots of bad. ¬†Dad recovered amazingly well, and we had a tremendously supportive network of nurses, doctors, family and friends that helped carry us through. We needed every bit of love, as we traveled back and forth to the hospital and tried to manage work and stress and uncertainty and heartache.
  • While visiting a book store close to the hospital, I discovered the beautiful book, “Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living” by Krista Tippett. ¬†I picked the book up because it was on display, and I was drawn by the simple yellow¬†and white cover and the direct title. ¬†I had never heard of Krista Tippett before. ¬†I am so glad I randomly picked up the book. It is beautifully written. I have a hard time putting it down.
  • But I did put it down – to read another amazing, life-changing book, “The Great Work of Your Life: ¬†A Guide for the Journey to Your True Calling” by Stephen Cope. ¬†I recently started to see a therapist to help identify my true purpose is life. Why did the Universe or God or The Source or my Witness self, put me in this body in this family, in this life? ¬†My therapist informed me that this “purpose” is called dharma, and she recommended this book. ¬†I blazed through it in about 2 weeks. ¬†The book is riddled with highlights and notes, and I really feel as if I need to read it several more times. Stop reading this blog post and go read it right now!! Tell me what you think.
  • Dharma. ¬†Wow. ¬†That’s a big topic that’s been consuming a lot of time and mental energy. I have some ideas, some inklings, some wishes, some hopes, LOTS of fears, and lots of thinking to do. More to come on that.

And that’s about it. I’ve been altering my yoga teaching to be more Yoga Tune Up¬ģ focused, and I’ve had a couple of new students come to my 5:30AM class as a result. ¬†I love teaching it and seeing people all chilled out and more embodied by the time they leave. I just really love it! ¬†I’m hoping to add more classes and/or workshops in the next few months.

I think that about brings you up to speed. Each one of the points above really deserves its own blog post, but it’s 6:20, and I need to finish prepping for my class tomorrow, take a walk and then practice my new obsession, somatic meditation!

I hope you are doing well, and I will talk to you soon!

 

Summer in Iowa

How do you know it’s summer in Iowa? ¬†Well, I just spent 30 minutes cutting up kale, zucchini, summer squash, potatoes, onions, and watermelon. ¬†Tim is grilling the potatoes and onions (check me out on Instagram for picture proof), and the rest of the menagerie is going into the fridge for eatin’ later on. ¬†We joined a CSA this summer, and several batches of wilted greens and shriveled squash has taught me that if I don’t cut up the veggies IMMEDIATELY, they are a lost cause.

It’s amazing that I am actually accomplishing anything today. ¬†We returned home from Fort Collins, Co last night around 8:30PM, so today is our recup day. Does everyone need a recup day after vacation, or is that just me? ¬†Regardless, I did some Heather self-care today to prepare myself for my strenuous one-day work week tomorrow. ¬†Self-care for me looks like rolling out my abdominals with the Corgeous ball, taking an epsom salt bath, and listening to the Design of the Body podcast whilst walking along Duck Creek. ¬†Oh, and shopping online. ūüôā ¬†We didn’t get to do much shopping in Ft Collins, so I made up for it once I got home.

If you are like me, you are always interested in what other people are buying, so I will fill you in on the details.  For the past several months I have been looking for a wristlet that will fit the essentials Рcards, ID, phone, chapstick, pen, and keys.  My sister-in-law introduced to me to Haiku. I really like their designs and their philosophy, so I ordered the Stride wristlet. I will let you know what I think once I receive it and put it through its paces. I know you are on pins and needles.

I’m going to another Yoga Tune Up¬ģ class next week – Breath and Bliss, taught by Jill Miller. ¬†We are supposed to bring our own yoga mats, but I don’t want to travel with my full size Manduka (although I totally love it), so I bought the travel version. It’s so light and thin that you can fold it up! ¬†Hopefully it works well.

I also bought 3 different versions of wire-free bras. I love underwires, but some experts say they¬†can cause a variety of¬†issues, so I am widening my horizons and checking out some wire-free bras from Wacoal. ¬†You can find a TON of wire-free options at Kohl’s and Target, but I tried on TEN different ones today, and they all gave me wide, pointy boobs. ¬†Boo to wide, pointy boobs. ¬†Wacoal bras are pricey, but they last forever, and they give a great shape. ¬†Hopefully that hold true for their non-underwire versions.

That is my day back. ¬†Riveting, isn’t it!?